Sex education for babies and toddlers, aged 0-2 years

by

Sex education for babies, toddlers and infants

Sex education for babies, toddlers, and infants. Image credit: orm.es

 

Health Education:

Sex education for babies, toddlers, and infants, aged 0-2 years

 

You may have watched Sex Education Seasons 1, 2, and 3 films but haven’t read Sex Education Seasons 1, 2, and 3 in texts.

In Sex Education Season 1 in Text, we defined sex education, sexuality education, and sexual health education and stated the difference between the three concepts in Sexual and Reproductive Health Education in writing. We shall in this season 3a in Text; discuss sex education for babies and toddlers, aged 0-2 years.

In this blog post Season 3a, you shall find:

 

Is sex education for babies and toddlers? Why should I talk to an infant about sexual health?

Sex education to infants is not just about sex

When should I start sex education for babies and infants?

Sex, sexuality, and sexual health education for babies and toddlers

Reasons why sex education should be given to babies and toddlers

 

Is sex education for babies and toddlers? Why should I talk to an infant about sexual health?

 

The fact that babies and toddlers do not talk but blabber what others may not understand does not mean that they can’t be taught to understand and learn. They learn by seeing, hearing, and impulse but not talking.

If you’ve asked the question whether sex education is for babies and toddlers, then the answer is ‘Yes’, and talking to your babies, toddlers, and infants about sex, sexuality and sexual health are never too early. Talking to toddlers about sexuality can be challenging even in the early stages of development but such an early start should be developmentally-appropriate for all ages.

According to UNESCO, sexuality education is not damaging to children or adolescents provided that the range of topics covered are tailored to the age and developmental level of a child (age-appropriateness). Children are conscious of and know these relationships long before they act on their sexuality and therefore need the skills to understand their bodily developments, intimate relationships, and feelings from an early age.

 

Sex education to infants is not just about sex

Sex education for babies, infants, and toddlers is not about having sexual intercourse since sex education can wrongly imply to some that children will be taught “how to have sex” but how a child develops, the child’s feelings about her body, of closeness, intimacy, attraction, and affection to other that defines the extent of her relationships and maintains healthy relationships.

 

When should I start sex education for babies and infants?

Sex education starts for babies when you notice that they have become sensitive and started coordinating simple motor actions. When such developmental milestones set in, you can start naming the human body parts as often as necessary especially when dressing him up or changing him out.

Sex education can still start at any time during the early childhood stage because children grow and develop at their own individual pace but some health education experts believe sex education is better started the child sets the pace with his or her curious questions. For me, sex education should start earlier than the time of curious questioning because it may start later than the expected time.

 

Sex, sexuality, and sexual health education for babies and toddlers

1. Toddlers should be able to name all the human body parts including the sex organs. Find moments every day to teach your babies, toddlers, and infants about their human body parts. Being able to use correct names for body parts at this early stage in life will allow them to communicate any health issues, injuries, or sexual abuse better. It also helps them understand that the use of these body parts should be considered as normal as any other parts, thereby promoting self-confidence and a positive body image. This can be better achieved when the baby is bathing, dressing up or undressing or when emphasis is to be laid on a part or some parts of the body.

2. For the fact that many toddlers express their natural sexual curiosity through self-motivation, they should understand that their body parts including genitals should not be touched inappropriately but be treated with privacy. Boys should not pull at their penises, and girls should not rub their vaginas.

3. Infants should differentiate boys from girls without giving details of the sexual biological features.

 

Reasons why sex education should be given to babies and toddlers

Why sex education for toddlers and babies

Why sex education for toddlers and babies. Image credit: digitalchew.com

 

Children learn about sex and sexuality from somewhere else (media – TV, computer internet services, games, peers, and friends, etc.) rather than through their parents, and an opportunity to implant family values may be missed if that happens. Children’s exposure to sex-related information begins much earlier than many parents assume. Parents will have little control over sex education acquired by their children if they start to educate them lately or fail to do it at all.

Early open, honest and reliable communication about sex can make your children understand that sex and sexuality are healthy parts of life and will make them rely on you for healthy sexuality education in the future as they become more mature without feeling embarrassed or scared. Again, it provides a solid basis for children to make healthier choices about their sex life including their intimate relationship and choice of a sex partner.

If the subject of sex education does arise during the childhood stage, there is a significant risk that the child will not be receptive to the message when she becomes a teenager.

 

In our other Health Education posts, you will find:

 

Could coronavirus vaccine cause spinal cord damage?

How honeybee venom can cure deadly breast cancer cells

Sex, Sexuality and Sexual Health Education

Approaches, Forms, and Types of Sex Education

 

This blog content on ‘Sex education for babies and toddlers, aged 0-2 years’ is categorized under Health Education

Our Health Education system is about creating and delivering impacting and empowering information relating to our health to our amiable readers for good, quality, and sustainable future healthy living – Eduonwheels